Diarys

Diary entry #1

President Johnson is showing us that he cares a lot about us people living in poverty. I feel like he knows us well because he himself also lived in poverty and was also a teacher in a low-income area so I feel like he knows how we live every day. He knows that we are just trying to get by every day and he wants our wealthy, powerful government to help us through this struggle. I would really appreciate it if they could help me in the meantime while get back on track. President Johnson has now declared “unconditional war on poverty in America”. He has now started many new programs that are directed at the youth Americans living in the inner city. The job corps in helping the young unemployed find jobs. Also the neighborhood Youth Corps provided work-study programs to help underprivileged young men and women earn a high school diploma. I really appreciate what president Johnson is doing for us and how he is helping the youth out a lot so they can get a good career and not have to live in poverty.

 

 

 

 

Diary Entry #2

President Johnson is now working on creating the “Great Society” he promised many Americans this. Also the major goals of the civil rights were achieved with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 this barred discrimination of many kinds and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which ensured African Americans’ rights to vote. There are so many programs being passed one of the good ones that was passed was Medicare and Medicaid. Medicare was good thing because many of the elderly right now don’t have health insurance and also when I get older I know I will get a little help from the government. Medicaid was also created and this was for the people that lived in poverty I am also proud of this because I myself live in poverty and I will now get help. Iam so happy for what President Johnson is doing for our society he really does care about the people.

 

 

 

 

Diary Entry #3

The Great Society program is very helpful to our community because it strongly supports education. Millions of dollars have been granted to public and private schools for classroom materials and special education programs from the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965. Another program Upward Bound was Designed to provide college preparation for low income teenagers. President Johnson has helped us in many ways from helping us getting jobs to helping children succeed and get help in their education. Many people don’t think of him as a strong president but he has done lots for the people that really needed the help so I thank him lots for helping me and others through our struggle and for actually thinking about how he could help our community. Thanks to President Johnson’s “Great Society” kids will be able to get a good education and get out of this poverty.

 

 

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Interviews

#1 Interview with Dede Bett

 

Question: Where did you live/what were you doing in the 1960’s and 1970’s?

 

Response: In the 1960’s moved from Pasadena to Corona close by riverside was a kid during the time. Was born in 1950.

 

Question: What kind of clothes did you wear/ music did you listen to?

 

Response: From the ages of 10-12 listened to Elvis In 1964 started to listen to the Beatles and Rolling Stones. Couldn’t wear pants to school only dresses to school more formal.

 

Question: Do you remember anything about the Vietnam and/or protest movements? Where you involved in either anyway?

 

Response: Moved to Dana Point in the late 1960’s so she would hear planes flying over. Was against the war, she saw someone get killed on T.V. Sister in-laws boyfriend was drafted got cancer form agent orange chemicals used during the war. Was too young to be really involved in protest movements.

 

Question: What do you remember about President Kennedy? Domestic/foreign Policy? Assassination?

 

Response: Was at school during the assassination of President Kennedy.

 

Question: Where you involved/what do you remember about the Civil Rights movement?

 

Response: Was friends with people from different ethnicities. Preferred Martin Luther King over Malcolm X  because MLK was more peaceful and Malcolm X was more about fighting.

 

Question: What do remember about President Johnson Domestic/foreign policy?

 

Response: Knew about the great society but believed that people shouldn’t just rely on the governments money.

 

 

 

 

#2 Interview with Wanda Lewis

Question: Where did you live/what were you doing in the 1960’s and 1970’s?

 

Response: In the 1960’s lived in Hawaii moved to Minnesota in the 1970’s was going to collage university of Minnesota.

Question: What kind of clothes did you wear/ music did you listen to?

 

Response: Wore hippie clothes also wore miniskirts and jeans worked in a clothing store so was always into the latest fashion when went to collage not really into fashion. Listened to Rock n Roll and the mini blues

Question: Do you remember anything about the Vietnam and/or protest movements? Where you involved in either anyway?

 

Response: Protested against the Vietnam War in Minneapolis high school dad was a Vietnam veteran and died during his service.

Question: What do you remember about President Kennedy? Domestic/foreign Policy? Assassination?

 

Response: remembers that she was in school during the assassination was scared when she came home.

 

 

 

#3 Interview with Ken (Procter)

 

Question: Where did you live/what were you doing in the 1960’s and 1970’s?

 

Response: Lived in Compton then moved then moved to lake wood during high school, because of minorities moving into neighborhood it was becoming more dangerous.

 

Question: What kind of clothes did you wear/ music did you listen to?

 

Response: Wore regular clothes but during school had to wear collar shirt, slacks and dress shoes. Didn’t like listening to the Beatles because in his house they listened to more classic music. Didn’t really start listening to other music till later on.

 

Question: Do you remember anything about the Vietnam War and/or protest movements? Where you involved in either anyway?

 

Response: Remembers people were being drafted unless they went go to college. He was not going to collage so he got a draft card, numbers under 200 got drafted he was number 122. Was going to join the Air Force band didn’t end up getting drafted because didn’t pass the physical. People dying made him more political when he saw the people come back from war he saw them get spit on and things were said to them.

 

Question: Where you involved/what do you remember about the Civil Rights movement?

 

Response: Was young saw people get beat up and also saw riots. Went to a blacks and whites school Roosevelt high school. Was also in a bus when coming back from a football game that they had won and the bus that he was in got stoned by the other school.

 

Question: What do you remember about President Kennedy? Domestic/foreign Policy? Assassination?

 

Response: When he heard about President Kennedy’s assassination he was walking to P.E. He also knew about the Cuban missile crisis. Bomb shelters were sold in his neighborhood.

 

 

 

#4 Interview with Betty Lee (Guidance Secretary)

Question: Where did you live/what were you doing in the 1960’s and 1970’s?

 

Response: In the 1960’s was going to high school graduated in 1964 in the 70’s was married with one kid.

Question: What kind of clothes did you wear/ music did you listen to?

 

Response: Was pretty conservative with clothes didn’t wear hippie clothes wore jeans

Question: Do you remember anything about the Vietnam and/or protest movements? Where you involved in either anyway?

 

Response: Was not involved in any protests but remembers that there were lots protests going on. Americans were getting discouraged that we were in Vietnam a long time, at the time it seemed pointless but we saved lots on lives.

Question: What do you remember about President Kennedy? Domestic/foreign Policy? Assassination?

 

Response: Was in school during the assassination and was shocked, this was at the time when she was relating to politics and her and her friends were shocked.

Question: Where you involved/what do you remember about the Civil Rights movement?

 

Response: Was not involved in the protest but all for Civil Rights Movement thought every person is equal was should be dealt with the same.

Question: What do remember about President Johnson Domestic/foreign policy?

 

Response: Was not a really strong figure head but did the best he could do.

 

 

 

#5 Interview with Debbie (Procter)

 

Question: Where did you live/what were you doing in the 1960’s and 1970’s?

 

Response: During the 1960’s lived in Pomona California in the 1970’s was going to high school.

 

Question: What kind of clothes did you wear/ music did you listen to?

 

Response: The music listened to was rock n roll and went to lots of concerts wore Levis corduroys.

 

Question: Do you remember anything about the Vietnam and/or protest movements? Where you involved in either anyway?

 

Response: Was in high school during the Vietnam war as got older was more involved in the protest movements. Would come home and would see the body counts on T.V her family and herself would cry seeing the dead body count.

 

Question: What do you remember about President Kennedy? Domestic/foreign Policy? Assassination?

 

Response: Was in school during the assassination people were crying her mom and her neighbors were also crying

 

Question: Where you involved/what do you remember about the Civil Rights movement?

 

Response: Was old enough to know what the protest was about. Went to the south and saw the blacks and whites drinking fountain thought it was weird because they didn’t have that in California.

 

Question: What do remember about President Johnson Domestic/foreign policy?

 

Response: Remembers he was not very popular by the adults.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Done It

German Ramirez
Page 1 – Intro
Page 2 – Interview
Page 3 – Political Cartoons
Page 5 – Songs
Page 6 – Diaries

Nick Nguyen
Page 4 – Poems
Page 7 – Watergate
Page 8 – Essay
Page 9 – Works Cited
Page 10 – Who Done It

Essay( 1960’s lessons 0)

Lessons from the 60’s
The 1960’s was a time that America can never forget. So much happened during this decade that affected things that are going on today. From wars to political affairs the 60’s was full of lessons that Americans should take into account. The majorities of parents today have experienced the 1960s and can pass experience to their children to prevent certain things from happening. Three major events that happened in the 1960s were the Vietnam War, Civil rights movement, and the Presidential elections. The following events influenced many things that are around in the present day.
The Vietnam War was one that the majority of America was opposed to rather than supportive. It was one that started for controversial reasons that are still even arguable today. Before the war began, Vietnam was facing influences from other nations like France. The Vietnamese people had enough and fought back to gain their independence and become a communist nation with the help of the Soviet Union. The United States’ reason to enter Vietnam when the Communists of the North went to war on the South was that if one country fell, others will fall behind it. This was called the Domino theory and many Americans disagreed with this idea at the time. This war was one of many new technologies like the use of napalm to burn jungles. The death rate for Americans was much higher than the ones of previous wars fought because of the Vietcong’s guerilla style of war which was unfamiliar to Americans. America learned that foreign affairs should be seen as neutral to America. They knew very little with what they were getting into and underestimated the enemy. After the war many people lost trust in the government.
As the war was going on another one was fought in the heart to the United States. This war was for equality between all Americans. African Americans were had rights but not equality among their fellow Americans. Racism still buzzing around the country and seemed almost out of hand. African Americans had enough and decided to stand up and fight for equality. One famous incident was when Rosa Parks wouldn’t get up from the front and go to the back the bus. This inspired so many people to do something to change how America treated minorities. People would march and sit-in to gain recognition without violence. Many African Americans were being attacked and humiliated still, but they endured on. Martin Luther King Jr. was an inspiring leader during the time of the Civil rights movement. He taught non-violent protests to gain equality but results were not going anywhere. He would later be assassinated by gunshot. Over time legislations and other things the government established would help bring equality among Americans but still racial tension is present in Modern America.
The leaders of America during the 1960s was varied and diverse. John F. Kennedy was the first President of the 60’s and was a great leader. He gave hope to Americans and his life was cut short when he was shot in a parade. Lyndon B. Johnson would take over and have to deal with what Kennedy started, Vietnam. He would lose popularity for his decisions to involve the United States in Vietnam but he did pass many antipoverty and civil rights programs. He would be a one term President mostly due to the lack of support in Vietnam. In the late year of 1969 President Nixon would be elected. He improved U.S. relations with the Soviet Union and China. Also, he gradually would return soldiers home from Vietnam with an idea called Vietnamization. But Nixon would be known the best for the Watergate scandal which he would later resign because of. The 1960’s held some of the hardest working Presidents in American History.
Americans learned that if there is no peace at the home front there won’t be anywhere else. Citizens of one country cannot be so divided like they were during the 60’s and years before that. Foreign affairs should sometimes be analyzed more before we go into something that could have huge consequences. Vietnam, Civil Rights, and the Presidents that watched over all taught America a lesson that they don’t know everything. The 60’s is an era that Americans will never forget.

Works Cited

1.”Watergate Scandal.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 05 May 2013.
2.“Biography.” Martin Luther King Jr. -. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 May 2013.
3.“About.” MalcolmX.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 May 2013.
4.“Rosa Parks Bus – The Story Behind the Bus.” Rosa Parks Bus – The Story Behind the Bus. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 May 2013.
5.“Vietnam War.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
6.“Analyzing Attitudes on the Vietnam War through Political Cartoons.” Analyzing Attitudes on the Vietnam War through Political Cartoons. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
7.“Watergate: The Scandal That Brought Down Richard Nixon.” Watergateinfo. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
8.Infoplease. Infoplease, n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
9.“56e. Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society”” Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society” [ushistory.org]. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
10.“Program for the Human Environment.” The Environment Since 1970. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
11.“56a. The Election of 1960.” The Election of 1960 [ushistory.org]. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
12.“Counterculture.” -. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
13.“Reflecting on the Lessons of the 1960′s.” International Communist Current. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
14.“Civil Rights Movement.” History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 08 May 2013.
15.Appleby, Joyce Oldham. The American Vision: Modern times. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2010. Print.

HYPERLINKS

1.http://www.history.com/topics/civil-rights-movement
2.http://watergate.info/
3.http://www.biography.com/people/martin-luther-king-jr-9365086
4.http://www.thehenryford.org/exhibits/rosaparks/story.asp
5.http://www.malcolmx.com/about/bio.html

Fortunate Son
By: Creedence Clearwater Revival

Some folks are born to wave the flag,
Ooh, they’re red, white and blue.
And when the band plays “Hail to the chief”,
Ooh, they point the cannon at you, Lord,

It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no senator’s son, son.
It ain’t me, it ain’t me; I ain’t no fortunate one, no,
Yeah!

Some folks are born silver spoon in hand,
Lord, don’t they help themselves, oh.
But when the taxman comes to the door,
Lord, the house looks like a rummage sale, yes,

It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no millionaire’s son, no.
It ain’t me, it ain’t me; I ain’t no fortunate one, no.

Some folks inherit star spangled eyes,
Ooh, they send you down to war, Lord,
And when you ask them, “How much should we give?”
Ooh, they only answer More! more! more! yoh,

It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no military son, son.
It ain’t me, it ain’t me; I ain’t no fortunate one, one.
It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate one, no no no,
It ain’t me, it ain’t me, I ain’t no fortunate son, no no no,

“Stairway To Heaven”
By: LED ZEPPELIN

There’s a lady who’s sure all that glitters is gold
And she’s buying a stairway to heaven.
When she gets there she knows, if the stores are all closed
With a word she can get what she came for.
Ooh, ooh, and she’s buying a stairway to heaven.

There’s a sign on the wall but she wants to be sure
‘Cause you know sometimes words have two meanings.
In a tree by the brook, there’s a songbird who sings,
Sometimes all of our thoughts are misgiven.

Ooh, it makes me wonder,
Ooh, it makes me wonder.

There’s a feeling I get when I look to the west,
And my spirit is crying for leaving.
In my thoughts I have seen rings of smoke through the trees,
And the voices of those who stand looking.

Ooh, it makes me wonder,
Ooh, it really makes me wonder.

And it’s whispered that soon, if we all call the tune,
Then the piper will lead us to reason.
And a new day will dawn for those who stand long,
And the forests will echo with laughter.

If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed now,
It’s just a spring clean for the May queen.
Yes, there are two paths you can go by, but in the long run
There’s still time to change the road you’re on.
And it makes me wonder.

Your head is humming and it won’t go, in case you don’t know,
The piper’s calling you to join him,
Dear lady, can you hear the wind blow, and did you know
Your stairway lies on the whispering wind?

And as we wind on down the road
Our shadows taller than our soul.
There walks a lady we all know
Who shines white light and wants to show
How everything still turns to gold.
And if you listen very hard
The tune will come to you at last.
When all are one and one is all
To be a rock and not to roll.

And she’s buying a stairway to heaven.